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to doma. this was john lewis, 1996, talking about the civil right, the right of a human being to marry another. their there has been a long struggle for civil right for gay and lesbian people. and there were people early on who recognized this was a fundamental civil rights issue. the reason people are coming to that view is because of people coming out in their countries and whether it is john roberts or other people in the country realizing that they are brothers and sisters and cousins of people who are gay and lesbian. and it is inevitable. watching ralph reed with the most ridiculous argument i've ever heard of the many ridiculous arguments against gay marriage. he's arguing the only reason people get player sid to have children. people get married because they want to be in a loving, committed relationship with each other. there is no reason that fundamental right should be denied. >> to steve's point, ralph reed was not discussing the lawful he is talking about religion and emotional reaction to marriage and the sanctity of it. i want to play this. he was on "meet the press." >>
. >>> 48 years ago this month, the nation reached a turning point in the civil rights movement. the third and decisive civil rights march from selma to birmingham, alabama. >> kill, burn, bomb destroy. people go into selma is a whole different game. >> reporter: harry bellefonte remembers the backdrop, the selma to montgomery marches in 1965. 50 miles had to be covered, but the real obstacle was hate. not long after 600 marchers began on sunday, march 7th, police brutally beat them, driving them back to selma. >> when bloody sunday happened and then dr. king decided to march again after it. what was the mood? >> the mood was anger. the mood was rebellious. the question is, what do we do in the face of this kind of rage and mayhem. the bottom line is we will go back as often as necessary. >> reporter: bring artists into the movement convince the likes of joe biaz and marlin brando but one of his first calls was to old friend and supporter tony bennett. >> i didn't want to do it, but then he told me what went down, what was going down and how some blacks were burned with gasoline thrown on
of the civil rights division at the justice department the president also marked women's history month today, but talking about the long fight for equal rights. >> 100 years ago this month, thousands of women were marching right outside this house, demanding one of our most fundamental rights, the right to vote. a century later. its rooms are full of accomplished well who have overcome discrimination, shattered glass ceilings, and become outstanding role models for all of our sons and daughters. all of you inspire me to make sure that i'm doing everything that i can as president to carry on that progress. >>> and he keeps that promise. less than two weeks ago the president signed the new violence against women act into law, part of a broad progressive push we have seen in this second term. a kyle senate panel is said to be close to a deal on immigration. unemployment is down to 7.7%, the lowest level in four years. since the gop's big loss, republicans have spent a lot of times looking backwards, but the president is moving the country ahead. joining me now is victoria defran chez ko soto, a
of churches and civil rights movement and when you look at the role really of societal movements, they often leap ahead of the law. and we're seeing that right now with this is an example. the fact this can happen in winston salem, again, it's the fifth largest city here in north carolina. you know, this is really unprecedented and you know, among methodist churches, you have some others in places like austin and chicago and of course, california, that that have enacted similar moves like this, but not in the deep south. not in north carolina. this is really important what's happening here. >> give me a brief answer. do you think we'll see marriage equality in your lifetime? >> in north carolina? well, you know, i write about manners, so not a great thing to ask someone their edge, but i'm hopeful that it's coming. >> all right. thank you so very much. >> thank you, michael. >> that's the ed show. the rachel maddow show starts now. >>> thanks to you at home for joining us. the great state of florida does not right now have a lieutenant governor. they have a governor, of course. you know, old
is that this is like civil rights. that this is the civil rights movement moved to the gay and lesbian community. why is that not the case? >> well, we understand historically that keeping the races apart is wrong. what marriage is about is bringing together the two opposite halves of humanity for a deep social good. that's why as president obama himself said, there are people of good will on both sides of this issue. what we need the supreme court to do is not try to short circuit this debate. we need to keep the debate alive. americans on both sides of this issue are deeply invested in this debate. we don't need a 50-state solution presented by the supreme court. when our democratic institutions are capable of handling the issue. that's what the court will decide. whether it's going to impose a redefinition of marriage among all americans or whether we're going to be allowed to continue to work on this together state by state. >> so not a roe v. wade decision is what's being argumented, don't make a decision that then sets the stage arguing four years to come. >> look, candy, this case -- the case
-- >> yes. and civil rights. he said to all of them, i agree with all of your positions. i want all of your things. but i have to tell you something, i'm not going to be able to do it. and i'm not going to do it. you're going to have to make me do it. he said that to them, make me do it. so fellow americans, that's our job. if we are calling ourselves citizens, that means we are participants in democracy. it is not that they sit back and they sit in some hall some place. we are the ones in charge. they are our servant. they are there to serve us. if they don't hear from us, then you know, who is going to win out are the money people. the gun manufacturers, national rifle association, people that grease the palms. that's who will win out. but this is what the nra is scared about tonight and gun manufacturers. there's a lot more of us than there are of them. >> no doubt. so they won't be able to hold us hostage. let's talk about something else you're doing, because i want to get this in. first i thought you were making house party part 4 but i discovered that's not what is going on. you are g
's civil rights division as his mom knee to head the labor d., and we will carry that announcement live at about 11:40 eastern this morning here on c-span2. also at 12:30, remarks from michigan senator carl levin. he'll be speaking at the council on foreign relations on u.s. defense policy issues. life coverage begins at 12:30 eastern again here on c-span2. and the u.s. house and senate return today to consider continuing funding for the federal government past march 27th when current funding expires. they're also expected to work on their respective budget plans for fiscal year 204. the house back at 2 p.m. for legislative business. floor debate likely while members wait for the senate to ask. also the senate in at 3 p.m. --2 p.m. eastern. and then hoping to move on to the 2014 budget resolution, and they hope to get it approved before by the end of the week before the easter recess. life coverage of the house, as usual, on c-span and, of course, the senate right here on c-span2. ..2 last week endorsed a review of military roles to allow seniors to manage overturns sexual assault victi
unconstitutiona. now, the supreme court has been asked to weigh n which is why these civil rights leaders gage yord to say smi ni decision will affect what happens here in california. >> we're seeing if it's unconstitutional to violate rights in michigan then why is it being done in california? >> in the first year after prop 209 passed, uc bolt lawsuit reported of the 271 students admitted only one was african american. tanya capner is an example of how things changed. >> so you face a situation where i was the only black student in the class after the ban for education program that. is just unacceptable. >> ward connereely is considered to be the man behind prop 209 and michigan's antiaffirmative action law. >> there is nothing more fundamental in my view than right to equal treatment bit government of every citizen in this country. >> bertrall ross teaches law at uc berkeley. >> two laws are similar to each other. i would say whatever the court says about prop 2 would have the same impact on prop 209. >> the supreme court will reaffirm the antiaffirmative action law in the fall. one footnot
right now and heads up the civil rights division and president obama apparently pleased with him and wanting him to head over to head up the labor department and the wall street journal had a piece today that talked about how, quote, political muscle undermind the rule of law under mr. perez's civil rieghts division. in simple terms, what is the allegation that mr. perez did? >> one of the allegations is that he interfered and cost the american taxpayers 180 million dollars by getting a case dismissed where he didn't want to face the supreme court decision and gave up two very valid cases again, 180 million dollars of taxpayer money in st. paul. this was unprecedented. it had been set for additional this nominee has been expressed as not having been candid in his testimony. candid is it kind of one of the funny words in politics that means he didn't tell the whole truth. this is also somebody who refused to do his fundamental job which is to fully prosecute voter intimidation that fell under his watch. these are just some of the areas of concern that i think that senators have an
're meddling. if we stay back, they say why aren't you standing up for civil rights. >> guest: absolutely. and i think that is the fate of a superpower, right? it is a catch 22. people want you to deliver for them, but they don't necessarily want to give you what it takes to deliver for others. so it's all about your own, your own interests. and, um, i do quote the this official who say we're kind of damned if we do, damned if we don't. and, you know, the pendulum swings constantly. it's a cyclical thing. look at syria now. people are very, very upset in syria and in the region to some extent and here in the u.s. you listen to senator john mccain, very upset that the u.s. isn't intervening, isn't doing something. there was, you know, perhaps as much upset when the u.s. decided to go to war in iraq. now there's upset because of inaction, and, you know, under the bush administration there was upset because of action. so it's a struggle to find that fine line. >> host: i think it's break time. [laughter] >> guest: great. >> on the go? "after words" is available via podcast. visit booktv.org
, would we have allowed mississippi in 1960 to determine the civil rights of african-americans? i think the answer is absolutely not. i don't want any state telling me yes or no. i want the federals telling them to say yes. >> thank you both. >>> next, the new green giant. dylan ratigan gives back to the community and america's bravest. stay with us. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and wod always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. bring your own lettuce. byol. and we'll dress it up with grilled chicken. crunchy veggies. fruits, dressings and crispy noodles. new lean cuisine salad additions. just byol. find us in frozen. earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just abou
a small bit at a time. >> civil rights. >> sure. certainly entitlements come to mind as well. the fact is, there is a period a few days after new town. where the idea of bringing back the ban on assault weapons would not have seen totally crazy. three or four months later, it's pretty clear that it's not going to happen now and the politics have not changed. time passes on, people move on, and we in the media cover other things and we're back to where we were prenewtown in a lot of ways. >> i think things have changed in this separates, it's safe to talk about guns, the president could mention guns in the state of the union. if everybody plays their cards correctly, we could see an expanded background checks, that would be a big thing. things have changed. >> it's incremental change, ruth. >> in two weeks we'll find out, we'll have the debate. ruth marcus, jonathan martin, thank you. up next, senator richard blumenthal on the future of the gun control legislation in the senate. you are watching "andrea mitchell reports." a febreze experiment. to prove febreze can keep this car fresh, we l
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil rights abuse. we need to make certain we are focused on the greatest revenue -- on the greatest american public. that really is in hansard are supporters of the -- in the hands of the prosecutors at the department of justice. >> what we are going to do is we are going to introduce the bill after -- and i am going to ask to your comments -- after the recess. it will be the bipartisan two of us. to set up a national commission made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative states. they have had to respond to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. ofare looking for a chairman stature who can come and take a year to report. i think our present system is dysfunctional and i sense there are very few people working the prisons. industry has been decimated because of congress. we tried to get prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made in the united states. there are only two baseball cap manufacturers i
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
. great to have you here. >> welcome. uma: how do you successful will the civil rights groups will be when they take aim at what governor brewer has done? >> i think they're going to be successful. i think the federal law is what controls here, but i understand where the governor's coming from. her state is the one that suffers the most apparently by people coming here illegally. she needs to stand up. she needs to make a statement. she needs to say, we're not going to tolerate this, even if she will wind up losing in the federal court system. even if the federal judges say, no, no, this is federal issue. this isn't a state issue. there are certain issues, governor, you're in charge of but there are other issues where the president is in charge. uma: why isn't this seen as state issue particularly the time it will affect the citizens of that state? >> there is something called the supremacy clause. this is recalcitrant act by jan brewer. she is saying i will ignore president obama's executive order because i don't think it is federally authorized. yet, the state policy itself is up consist
. and equally as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. based on his consultations with parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that esulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in ordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of ordan for their extreme warmth nd hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless, we are very much appreciative
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
partnership regime and how foreign is equivalent to civil regimes elsewhere. it is in all the rights to domestic partners. it does not give the name. we said earlier that it cannot call themselves married. they can call themselves whenever they want. >> not if they apply for a passport. >> of their married the cannot do that. >> it is a federal crime. merit on a federaler o form? -- married on a federal form? sides agree both that the word marriage matters. the gays and lesbians as a degradation of some sort of recognition. those of us supporting to a traditional marriage see the word marriage draws on its that is tiedole to procreation and child rearing. we want men and women to understand that marriage is the ideal context in which to raise children, and in a sense to read the fine marriage in a way that eliminates the essential components. >> you have a bunch of people out there raising children right now cannot get married. if you think marriage is an important thing to happen your parents, if you think they would benefit from having unmarried parents. hawthorne and they have all
, but marriage is not a religious right. it's a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decidings who gets married and who doesn't. so in 1967, there was a supreme court case loving v. virginia and blacks continue marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that 9-0. it was -- they have ruled now fourteen times about the fundamental right to marriage. from the legal substantiate -- standpoint there's no argument. you can a make a moral standpoint. from a legal substantiate -- standpoint. how broadly they will rule, that we don't know. >> the nation's highest court hears highest arguments challenging proposition 8 the constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1:00 p.m. eastern. the reaction will play tomorrow night on c-span2. wednesday they hear arguments over the constitutionality of defense of marriage act. c-span and c-span radio will again have cove
of the olympic medalist don carlos discuss their personal experiences during the civil-rights movement live at the virginia festival of the book, saturday at 8:00 eastern, part of book tv this weekend on c-span2. >> on washington journal, we spoke with members of congress about the federal budget. we heard from house budget committee vice-chairman tom price and jerrold nadler. this is an hour. host: now joining us is representative tom price, vice chair of the budget committee. also a member of the ways and means tax writing committee. if you would, start by bringing us up to date on where the house is when it comes to the continuing resolution to the 2014 budget. guest: the budget was passed out of the house a couple of weeks ago. the senate has been dealing with that. is the pathanding that last evening. it is back in the house and people like the past that today. it is good news. one of the things we included with the approach with spending reductions. the budget is an exciting activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of repr
department's civil rights division, we have pathways into the workforce for everyone willing to contribute including lg bt americans and immigrants. and he has helped settle some of the largest cases ever of those targeted by unfair mortgage lending. tom has also spent a career as a consensus builder. has worked with ceos and labor leaders and federal and state and local government levels. and throughout he understands that our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have the security that they need on the job. a democratic voice in the workplace. everybody playing by the same set of rules. his knowledge and experience will make him an outstanding secretary of labor. there is plenty of work to do. we will have to work very hard to make sure that folks find jobs with wages and benefits. we have to make sure that our veterans are returning home from iraq and afghanistan and they have a chance to put their incredible skills and leadership to work. we need to build immigration system that works for every employee and every family and every busine
, whether that be a mortgage fraud, fraud on wall street, public corruption, or civil rights abuses. we need to make certain that we prioritize, make certain we are focused on the greatest threats to the american public, and to the extent there is a determination as to what the ultimate resolution of an investigation or case is, that is in the hands of the prosecutors of the department of justice. >> thank you. i appreciate his question. what we're going to do, we're going to introduce a bill --i'm going to ask your comments on that -- after the recess. it is going to be bipartisan. we will set up a national made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative, some liberal, who have had to respond to the crowding, the prison crowding, more as an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. we're looking for a chairman or somebody of stature who can take a year and come back and report. i think our prison system is dysfunctional in the sense that very few people working in the it has beenstries, decimated, partially because of the congress. we
lewis and olympic gold medalist giancarlo discussed their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. saturday at 8:00 p.m. eastern, part of "booktv" on c-span2. "washington journal" continues. , at: jerrold nadler democrat of new york, a member of the progressive caucus. representative nadler, in the back toward budget proposal which was voted on yesterday in the house, you say that 7 million new jobs and go one year will be created if the congress and the president would adopt your budget. it would reduce unemployment to nearly five -- two near 5% and three years. it would reduce the deficit by $4.4 trillion over 10 years. and it would strengthen medicare and medicaid amah and you'd be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. -- medicare and medicaid and you would be asking the wealthy to pay their fair share. guest: the institute of policy analysis estimated that you are spending money on infrastructure. we have a to point to dollar trillion infrastructure deficit, according to the transportation -- american society of civil engineers. building roads, highways, bridges
social issues of our time. including the movement for civil rights. archbishop, leader of the greek orthodox church of america, carried that commitment forward when he marched alongside martin luther king jr. in selma, alabama, in 1965. an iconic photograph of those two great leaders appeared on the cover of "life" magazine. the historical relationship of these two proud communities embodies the greatness of america. on march 25 when we celebrate greek independence day, we salute all those who have struggled for freedom and rededicate ourselves to ensuring that america remains a symbol of fairness and opportunity the world over. i rise today also to mourn the passing of legendary greek american andrew a. athens of chicago. andy lived a life that few could match. he enlisted in the u.s. army in january of 1942 and fought at the famous battle of elal amean in egypt. he obtained the rank of captain and in 1945 was honored with the bronze star and u.s. army commendation medal for his outstanding military service. andy went on to become a successful businessman and walked with kings and
for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery and the civil rights movement into today. for generations that helped people persevere and holding on to hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in different parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke for a yearning for every human being for home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and the gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also now that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle. just like previous generations have. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed "i may not get there with you, but i want you to know we as a people will get to the promise land." [applause] so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation for justice and dignity and opportunity and freedom. for the jewish peop
out for human rights. let's support same sex civil union. for the first time in six years they voted him down. he got everything else through as head of that conference. they voted against him which means that most the bishops in that room were less progressive than pope francis on this issue. >> which is pretty incredible. by the way, for some people that may be surprised what civil unions get him is you can have civil unions and you don't have to use the term marry or have a religious ceremony. >> right. obviously the church is not ready for that, nor would pope francis be ready for that. he wanted to respect human rights. that's the real surprise here that people say he's anti-gay. can you be anti-gay marriage and not be anti-gay. i think there is a distinction here. he is moderate in this issue. >> it's an interesting point. i don't know that everyone would agree with you on that issue of whether you can be anti-gay, anti-gay marriage. but you're trying to draw that distinction, right? >> i think so. there is a distinction to be made. first of all, i don't think we should have he
working closely with more of the civil rights organizations that have sued. this particular case is, actually, it has been brought by native american tribes, and the reason for that, arizona once again being an outlier in the name supposedly of trying to deny undocumented immigrants from registering to vote which is a nonissue because most undocumented immigrants would not dare to vote. they're afraid to even call the police for a crime. what's happened since 2004 when this law went into effect, over 30,000 citizens have been denied the ability to register to vote or to show when they were at the polls were not allowed to vote. so that is what the lawsuit is about. it's whether the state of arizona can have different requirements than the national voter registration act. >> host: an important issue for illegal immigrants. we actually want to hear from them today, this morning during this segment. if you're an illegal immigrant and you want to call in and give your comments or thoughts on this subject, call us at 202 -- a special line, 585-3883. we can talk about the supreme court de
this? answer: yes. they can't target women or men or a racial group or a religious group because civil rights laws govern them. but the privacy laws permit them to make reasonable inquiry of their employees if the answer to the inquiry will help the business of the employer operate more efficiently. >>steve: this is scary because this means any company can do it. where do you draw the line? first they want to know how much you weigh, what your glow kos levels are. next they want to know are you a smoker? next do you drink coffee? >> i don't know how far this is going to go because this is the brave new world of obamacare kicking in. this is an unintended consequence or unrevealed consequence. >>alisyn: let me tell you what c.v.s. says their motivation is for doing this. a wellness review said colleagues know their key health metrics in order to take action to improve their numbers if necessary. is morethe wave of the personal responsibility in having to stop things like smoking and eating poorly if it's up to you. >> i don't think this is the wave of more personal responsibility. i thi
slavery and the civil rights movement into today. for generations that helped people persevere and holding on to hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally, growing up in different parts of the world and ithout firm roots, the story spoke for a urining for every human being for home. [applause] of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and the gift of freedom expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle. just like previous generations have. it means us working through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed "i may not get there with you, but i want you to know we as a people will get to the promise land." [applause] so just as joshua carried on after mow says the work goes -- moses the work goes on for all of you for justice, opportunity, for freedom. for the jewish people the journey of the promise of the the state of israel wound through
is not a religious right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not have a right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage licenses. the government decides who gets married in two dozen. so in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving v. virginia, and blacks couldn't marry whites. they challenged that and the supreme court ruled that nine nothing. it was, they have ruled now 14 times about the fundamental right to marriage. from a legal standpoint there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint there is no argument. so we feel confident that i'm an outcome how broadly the supreme court will rule? that we don't know. >> tomorrow the nation's highest court hears oral arguments challenging california's proposition eight, a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage in that state. c-span and c-span radio will have live coverage beginning at 1 p.m. eastern. the arguments along with reaction will play again on c-span tomorrow night at 8 p.m. eastern. on wednesday th
senator portman's view gay people ought to have equal marriage rights but he is fine with civil union, except he is apparently not fine with civil unions. he forgot he is actually against them. his office followed up with a statement that said the governor does not actually mean it. quote he may have used the term "civil union" loose lin this instance. the governor's position is unchanged. he gay marriage and changing ohio's constitution to allow for civil unions. ohio republicans banned civil unions for gay people in 2004 and john kasich supports that ban. when he said today quote if you want to have a civil union that's fine with me. he did not mean it. he forgot he doesn't actually believe that. his office had to clean it up and remind him he is actually way more anti-gay than he thinks he is. he had to take back his statement. this happens in republican politics a lot. remember in the presidential campaign, this used to happen to mitt romney all the time. the worst one was that cnbc interview he did with scott pelley. >> my position has been clear throughout this campaign. i'm in
of democracy and human rights and civil society, outside its own borders now for 200 years, just took on anmpossible taskn iraq. it just wasn't going to acceptst that. and i would say much more likely than that the american-- tank american influence will be incremental improvements in what is now a pretty dire situation, is that it's very likely to get worse, and lead to civil war, and it's not even clear that the most fundamental issue:00 is who governs in iraq, the majority shi'a, or the minority sunni, it's not even clear that that's, a settled issue, and if isn't a settled issue, and the sunnise prevail inyriand back theirl brothers across the borders of iraq and anbar, you may very well see a civil war, at least as brutal as we were witnessing in 2007 at the time time of the surge. >> rose: we will come back to manies thof point. >> or beloved late friend richard holbrooke once asked me. what did i think? what was my sounded bite about this war. i said we will did due course learn whether it was an open success or -- >> noble. >> he object toltd notification of noble failure.ct h
to have a civil union, that's fine with me. interviewing john kasich about his views on gay rights. this is a very relevant issue in ohio republican politics because ohio senator ron portman just changed his position to be in favor of gay marriage now because he has a gay son. he told this interviewer he has talked to senator portman about the issue, he does not share senator portman's view gay people ought to have equal marriage rights but he is fine with civil union, except he is apparently not fine with civil unions. he forgot he is actually against them. his office followed up with a statement that said the governor does not actually mean it. quote he may have used the term "civil union" loose lin this instance. the governor's position is unchanged. he gay marriage and changing ohio's constitution to allow for civil unions. ohio republicans banned civil unions for gay people in 2004 and john kasich supports that ban. when he said today quote if you want to have a civil union that's fine with me. he did not mean it. he forgot he doesn't actually believe that. his office had to c
on states trying to do their job, trying do things properly, has been made by the head of the civil rights division at justice, thomas perez, who is now nominated for labor secretary. this amendment and this proposal would clarify it by actually requiring photo i.d.'s for voting in federal elections. we require photo i.d.'s for traveling at airports. we require photo i.d.'s for going into a conditions. we require photo i.d.'s for a myriad of things, including visiting the white house. surely, it's a very legitimate, simple requirement that doesn't disenfranchise anyone to make sure the integrity of our election system is preserved. and i urge my colleagues to support this amendment. third, madam president, another amendment i will bring would finally require the u.s. visit system to be properly and fully executed and put in place. the u.s. visit system, as you know, madam president, is an entry-and-exit control system to track foreign nationals who are properly visiting our country with visas. a understanand so it tracks they come in, tracks them as they go out. and so if they oversay that
as important, the level playing field. this will ensure safeguards of civil liberties and political rights and obviously encourage political participation. today, we're looking forward to our prime minister form forming his government in the next couple of weeks, based on his consultations with parliament, which is an extension of the same consultation process that led to his designation and receiving the highest number of nominations. so i'm very proud of the progress so far. the hard work is definitely ahead of us and this is the moment we're saying is the third way in the middle east. what we are saying that the arab spring is behind us and we're looking at the arab summer for us all which means we all have to roll up our sleeves, it's going to be a bumpy and difficult road, but i'm very encouraged by the process and very excited about the future. so again, mr. president, very welcome to jordan, i wish you all the success in what you've been able to achieve in the past several days and i hope the success will continue. >> thank you very much. well, it's a great pleasure to be back in ju
after white oliander, there's going to be trouble. >> in some indicates, he infringing on civil liberties to try to save health care costs. is the mayor right about this? >> on this he is. i do think those will hurt him. as red-blooded americans the only thing more dear to me than my gun is my 28-ounce big gulp. a lot of americans agree. that will hurt him. >> you're never going to see a politician come out for the war on obesity because they're afraid of votes. you're not going to get someone to come out. michelle obama can say exercise is important. she's not going to say high fructose corn syrup's bad for you. you have people who don't want to be told that they're not normal. we're getting off track a bit. is it odd for wane lapierre, a lobbyist and head of the most powerful lobbying firm in america for 19 manufacturers for attacking mayor bloomberg for trying to influence politicians? >> i think wane's official job title is crazy uncle that you saw at thanksgiving but didn't want to. i think that's a part of the game when the other side does the same thing to coverable again
, you know. this right wing civil war and it's being waged quietly now because there's not a ton at stake in terms of elections but my gosh. ten years ago if you had thought a republican -- and republican leaders are basically urging politicians to embrace gay marriage, you know, the opposition which has been a cornerstone in the previous decade. suddenly embrace immigration reform and things like that. so you know, i don't think it is being done out of goodwill, honestly. i think is being done out of flip flopping and watching the polls. this is where the tension comes from, ralph reed talking about evangelicals will sit out. if they "embrace" gay marriage and the republican party and things like that. >> stephanie: same with immigration reform, right? they're basically saying we lost on that issue. >> sean hannity 24 hours after the election, he was like oh, forget it. ignore everything i've said for the last seven years. on the one hand, folks on the left can appreciate that they see it is a loser issue and if fox news throws in the towel on immigration hate, if they do, you k
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